Friday, May 13, 2016

Tabular Rasa

If you know me, you know I have a thing for simpleness. There is a word called simplicity, yes, but simpleness does a better job of driving the point home. I started my tech blog and my goal is really about removing layers, to evangelize tech with clarity. I don't do well with complications or fluff. But the reality is that we live in a world where life is almost always noisy, work is usually full of jargon (oh! trust me, if you have not worked for a company that's over 100 years old, then you know nothing, Jon Snow). It doesn't help that people just delight in verboseness, complicating things in a bid to sound or look intelligent.

So you can imagine the fulfillment and validation I got this week, when a senior colleague of mine stumbled on one of my work artifacts, and then publicly posted shoutout to me. His words were " ... may appear as a simple file but this file is so so so so HELPFUL and relevant ..."

So how do I protect my core?

Well, I doodle.



Yes, I am a whiteboarder. 


I have a whiteboard in my quiet spaces, office, bedroom, because I need to make complex things simple. Just having to think on a blank space, tabula rasa, heals/helps my mind a great deal and really ramps up my creativity.

And I sleep off to white noise.

Having said all that, I think Jason Fried might be one like me. I don't know, I just know, just as you know a kindred spirit when you meet one. Well, that might be debatable, especially as I haven't met him in person. However, there's something about this guy and/or his message that I connect with, in almost all the content he puts out and the style with which he does it. I read his book Rework, and it set something off in me. I took the time to write to him ... and he wrote me back. Impressive!


The funny thing is that he co-authored the book, with his current co-founder, but for some reason, I feel connected to his side of the duo. No math involved, I can't explain why, but it possibly started when I heard him say he hated meetings. Argh! Meetings. The bane of my existence and corporate career. Dude strikes me as practical, original, grounded: perhaps a solid version of future myself. I respect and admire his work and his message, and most of all I connect with the simpleness of both. I am reading his books, following his columns on Inc, his Medium articles, have watched his TED talk, and this week, I bought a book after reading his review on it. I really admire him for what he is building at Basecamp, and how he generally sees the world.


Plus I take my sleep a little more seriously now :)

I hope to meet him in person.



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